Vitamin C In Cosmetics

Vitamin C In Cosmetics

In today’s article, I would like to talk a little more about vitamin C, one of my favorite ingredients in cosmetics. In this article, I will tell how to use vitamin C correctly, the limitations, the forms of vitamin C, and show my cherry leaf with vitamin C.

 

What Is Vitamin C

Vitamin C

In general, let’s get acquainted; vitamin C is a wonderful anti-aging component that acts on several “fronts”:

  • Protects skin cells from oxidation or, to put it simply, is one of the most famous and popular antioxidants;
  • It stimulates collagen synthesis, strengthens the skin, increases its elasticity;
  • Returns the skin radiance and also evens out the skin tone;
  • Brightens the skin (pigment spots, traces of postage, etc.), plus fights the signs of photoaging of the skin;
  • It helps to strengthen capillaries (which is very useful for vitriol).

As for the effectiveness of vitamin C, this component also works at relatively low concentrations (type 1-2%).

 

Vitamin C forms

Next, I would like to say a few words about the forms of vitamin C (more precisely, about the most popular and widely used forms):

  • Ascorbic acid is just “pure” vitamin C, one of the most popular and active forms of vitamin C (and the cheapest, aha), with the most unstable and potentially irritating (acid form);
  • Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate (THDA) is one of the three most stable formulas and is quite soft. Recommended to use in the evening;
  • Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate (MAP) is another mild and very stable form of vitamin C (effective even in low concentrations);
  • Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate (SAP) is the third stable form of vitamin C, with a very mild (susceptible skin);
  • Ascorbyl Glucoside – a fairly stable form of vitamin C, helps to moisturize the skin;
  • Ascorbyl Palmitate is not the most stable form of vitamin C, but it is very mild(recommended in the evening).

 

On vitamin C stability

In general, as I have repeatedly written, vitamin C – is an extremely unstable companion, which, even in the most stable forms, still oxidizes in contact with air and sunlight. Therefore, ideally, you need to choose cosmetics in packages with dispensers (yes, I have a small item on the dispensers), preferably from dark non-transparent glass. If you buy a can of cream with vitamin C without a dispenser, be ready to immediately shift the whole case on small jars (otherwise, there will be no special sense in the use of such cream). Personally, for me, the format of using vitamin C in serums and daily masks is more convenient, but about it a little bit below.

And, well, and a little advice, I would very much advise, so to speak, not to put off the funds with vitamin C in the “long box” and use immediately because this component is really effective only for the first couple of months after the opening of the jar. Stretching and “saving” with vitamin C for the same reason make no sense.

 

Use of vitamin C with other “assets.”

Now let me talk about the use of vitamin C along with other “assets” (acids, retinol, niacinamide, etc.). In general, by and large, there are no official contraindications about the combination of vitamin C along with other components (well, that is, they will not neutralize each other). Vitamin C can be used “in pairs” with acids and with retinol. However, if you have sensitive or thin skin, I would not recommend such “duets” as too many “assets” can increase skin sensitivity or lead to irritation. Of course, it all depends on the density of the skin and the “activity” of the funds used (percentage of assets in the funds), but in general, I consider it the best option to breed different assets on different days of the week.

And I would like to speak separately about the combination of vitamin C and niacinamide, as there are too many myths on this topic. In fact, vitamin C and niacinamide get together peacefully. And we are talking about any forms of vitamin C. By. Large, for “something went wrong” (and niacinamide was hydrolyzed into nicotinic acid), you need a very high temperature, which is difficult to meet in real life (and even then, it is only pure vitamin C, not its derivatives). If someone is interested in reading more on this topic, here is the combination of vitamin C and niacinamide very well written by Paula Begun.

Regarding the combination of niacinamide and vitamin C in sensitive skin, again, there are no contraindications. The only possible variant of negativity is an individual reaction, which is impossible to predict. About “niacin flush” (strong redness and itching of the skin), which can occur in hydrolyzed niacinamide in nicotinic acid (in contact with niacinamide not only with vitamin C but also any acid product) – this again requires extreme temperature. Although again, personally, my unprofessional opinion that active components in sensitive skin do not need to mix, it is better to breed them on time.

 

Cosmetics with vitamin C

Well, let me briefly show you my “cherry” creams, masks, and serums with vitamins (some of the remedies from this cherry list I even had time to try, some just plan to buy).

Creams with vitamin C

  • Sunday Riley C.E.O. antiOXIDANT Protect and Repair Advantage is a cream with vitamin C (in a stable form Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate), which should fight pigmentation, strengthen the skin, stimulate collagen synthesis, moisturize the skin and align its tone (recommended to use in the evening);
  • Dermadoctor Kakadu C Face Creme is a face cream with vitamin C (in a stable form Of Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate). The cream should also strengthen and lighten the skin, increase elasticity, stimulate collagen synthesis (recommended to use in the evening). I wrote about this cream in detail here. Creams with vitamin C I do not like too much (because they are often sold in stupid jars without fanfare), so it is better to immediately go to serums (this format of use of vitamin C in cosmetics is much closer to me).

 

Serum with vitamin C

Serum with vitamin C

  • Sunday Riley C.E.O. Rapid Flash Brightening Serum is a serum with 15% vitamin C (in a stable form of Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate), which should soften wrinkles, combat pigmentation, improve skin tone, give the skin radiance and even skin tone (recommended to use in the evening);
  • Vitamin C Treatment Drops is an oily serum with vitamin C (in a stable form ascorbyl Tetraisopalmitate), which should lighten the skin, strengthen it, improve tone, give the skin a glow (recommended in the evening);
  • Oskia RenaissanceBrightlight is a wonderful serum with vitamin C (in the forms of SAP and Ascorbyl Palmitate), niacinamide, organic sulfur, fruit enzymes. Serum should strengthen the skin, fight pigmentation, lighten the skin, improve skin tone, give the skin radiance, even skin tone (recommended to use in the evening);
  • Perricone MD Vitamin C Ester Serum – serum with vitamin C (in Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate), hyaluronic acid, beta-glucans. The serum should return the skin to radiance, fight pigmentation, strengthen the skin and stimulate collagen synthesis (recommended to use in the evening);
  • Alpha-H Vitamin C Serum is a soft serum with vitamin C (in the form of Ethyl Ascorbic Acid), which should align the skin tone, return the skin to radiance and improve skin tone;
  • Perricone MD Vitamin C Ester 15% – serum with 15% vitamin C (in the form of Ascorbyl Palmitate). Serum should actively fight pigmentation, lighten the skin, stimulate collagen synthesis and give the skin radiance (recommended to use in the evening);
  • The Ordinary Ascorbyl Glucoside Solution 12% is a serum with 12% vitamin C (in the form of Ascorbyl Glucoside), which should give the skin radiance, lighten it, and even out the skin tone;
  • The Ordinary Ascorbyl Tetraisopalmitate Solution 20% in Vitamin F is a serum with 20% vitamin C (in the form of Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate), which should strengthen the skin, fight pigmentation, return the skin to radiance, and even out the skin tone (recommended to be used in the evening).

 

Masks with vitamin C

  • Lixirskin Vitamin C Paste is a morning mask with 10% vitamin C (in the most active form of Ascorbic Acid) and hyaluronic acid, which should awaken the skin, return the skin to radiance, even skin tone, provide antioxidant protection. Read more about this mask here;
  • REN Flash Rinse 1 Minute Facial is another beautiful morning mask with 10% vitamin C (in the forms of Ascorbic Acid and Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate), which should give the skin radiance, even skin tone, stimulate collagen synthesis, and awaken the skin;
  • Natura Biss’ C Vitamin Souffle Mask is the latest mask with vitamin C (inactive form Ascorbic Acid), which should soften and moisturize the skin, have an antioxidant effect, give the skin radiance, even out the skin tone.

 

Powdered Vitamin C

  • The Ordinary 100% L-Ascorbic Acid Powder is a pure vitamin C that can be mixed with any creams, serums, masks, etc. at your discretion;
  • Philosophy Turbo Booster Vitamin C Powder – and another powder, there is a little richer (with panthenol, zinc, copper, etc.).

 

Conclusion

That’s basically all I wanted to say about using vitamin C. I hope I didn’t miss anything. And in the photo above, those vitamin C products will be reviewed in the blog in the next few months (I have already started to use everything except oil from DermaDoctor actively, I postponed it for the fall). Do you use vitamin C in your routine? I’d love to have reviews of your favorite creams and serums for your face with vitamin C. A, and by the way, I’ve started a new tag in a blog called “Vitamin C,” but there are not many articles that are already a few reviews.

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